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See comment above), but @Jim, please look under 'have got', not 'got', which is something completely different. I/I've got this definition: 1. used to tell someone that you can or will deal with something: 2. used to tell someone that you…. I'm not quite sure why it is that foreign learners get the hang of "have got" quite early on, but some native speakers don't seem to be able to get their heads around it at all (I also teach English) . The truth is that not many people contract "I have" to "I've", and it doesn't sound very natural to me. Presumably by "interchanged" you simply meant misspelled. IE might you consider an enormous mountain to be different size than a very big mountain? "She's got naturally wavy hair and she's got a friendly disposition." @Warsaw Will, you clearly are too obsessed with specialist book definitions and don't pay enough attention to actual use. So, "I have" and "I have got" do not actually mean the same thing, but anything you can say one about, you can just as readily say the other about. But there's another, much simpler reason it would sound ridiculous - we just don't often elide sentences (miss words out) with "have" - "Have a car?" "got" is the past tense, but it's also a past participle. And there is also Standard Scottish English (SSE), a variant of Standard British English, which is to say "the characteristic speech of the professional class [in Scotland] and the accepted norm in schools" (and in the media), especially where it differs from Standard British English. In the spoken form, 'got to' is shortened to 'gotta' and the word 'have' is dropped. I made a comment that went something like, "I've got all the same color," meaning the cards. ", 37 votes "Have you got it with you?" ", It's interesting that when we really do want to use "have got" as the present perfect of "get", ie, to mean "obtain, acquire, buy" etc", we often add something else, like "just" or "myself", to make the meaning clear. In fact many linguists say that redundancy actually helps comprehension in spoken language . The simple answer is that "I have" is more commonly used in written English and "I've got" is more commonly used in spoken English. The only time it's used in AmE without have being contracted is when one wants to express that the action is critical (e.g. It seems the latest Scottish word to catch on in England is 'minging', (red-lined) which in Scotland originally meant smelling badly, but seems to be taking on a meaning among English young people of 'very bad, unpleasant or ugly'. Contractions are used for expedience, so go for the most efficient form that doesn't confuse. You're absolutely right that 'got' conveys no extra meaning, which has certainly confused some people, but it does suggest a difference in register. You can show off by using the archaic must needs. Released as a single on 7 September 1968, it was their second number-one single on the UK Singles Chart and their first US Top 10 hit. Informal (i.e. I wouldn't have missed my time in Eastern Europe not for all the tea in China. or fill in the name and email fields below: Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage says "Have will do perfectly well in writing that avoids the natural rhythms of speech. The only difference is that the "got" versions are more informal. McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. I for one am thrilled to hear that I may continue to use "I've got" with relative impunity. In the south of Italy it is the same as in British English but it refers only to the recent past in the north. It's no more complicated than that. What is more important? As others have said, it's more comfortable and rhythmic to use in everyday conversations. Next, Jim, I did give you a "legitimate references that goes further": Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage. red(d) up does indeed seem to mean clean or tidy up, and appears to have gone to America from Scotland, but I don't think I've ever heard it in Scotland. 86 votes They can be used interchangeably. But sometimes the pressure can be a bit much. It is a present tense - it's called the present perfect tense.   Report Abuse. You could use exactly the same argument about 'Ive got to', and 'I have to' - but I imagine there is an equally good reason why we often say 'I've got to'. I use it daily as do most of my native AmE speaking friends. ", I've got the world on a string, sitting on a rainbow, Today,they have got a modern lap top computer. In old German it was the same as in British English but now is used to mean the same as the past tense. "it's -11 C outside!" Anonymous i've got to do something or i've got a sore throat... these are examples of bad grammar slipping into american slang. I am more familiar with the America way. They mean completely different things separately. 2 votes In both countries you frequently hear "I've got", which is (in my opinion) completely interchangeable with "I have". Have (got) to go definition is - to be required to leave. got another think coming. In short, "have got" is perfectly good English. For example, they are much more likely to say "I have observed" than it's more natural equivalent "I've noticed". (notice either way,it is past tense) If you know of a legitimate reference that goes further, let me know. I think the most that can be said against "have got" is that it's redundant. What you say when you are 100% sure of your ability to make something your bitch. @Moucon - I wonder what you mean exactly when you say 'I've got' is the subjective form. What's more British course books don't "make a huge fuss" about "have got to", they simply let foreign students know that British native speakers will often use this. I'd have thought this one would have petered out by now, 22 months and still going strong! "I've Got a Lovely Bunch of Coconuts" is a novelty song composed in 1944 (as "I've Got a Lovely Bunch of Cocoanuts") by Fred Heatherton, a songwriting pseudonym for a collaboration of English songwriters Harold Elton Box (1903-1981) and Desmond Cox (1903-1966), with Lewis Ilda (itself a pseudonym of American songwriter Irwin Dash, 1892-1984). Trust what occurs in specific instances, not what general rules say. If you want to say this with proper grammar, the equivalent would be, 'I have got to' or 'I've got to'. - correct version - When I first knew her she had brown hair, * She had originally got black hair, apparently - again, where had she obtained it from? Have got has the same meaning as have and both are used as present tenses. 1 vote Now you should know that I've got can mean I possess in both BrE and AmE. There was a wee clue in the bottom left hand corner, but I guess you must have missed it. It's complicated tu use HAVE GOT and I don´t know why British grammar try to make our lives difficult. wouldn't work. One cannot hope to cover everything. Which is one of many reasons I don't go for the redundancy argument. This is street-level, conversational English at it's best. But there are some essential grammar points we have to make about when you can and can't use each construction. Here is Swan, in Practical English Usage, the "bible" for many EFL teachers and students - "Note that 'have got' means exactly the same as 'have' in this case (possession, relationships, illnesses characteristics etc)". Use which ever form you like in everyday, informal conversation. 2 0. My point is, I don't care if it's wrong or not. save someone's skin. Use it. ... Yea, I'v got it." When you say "I have" something, it means that you are in possession of it, nothing more and nothing less.   Permalink And we can only do so in the present; for everything else we also need to use "have" and "have to". The 'I've got' construction is nothing to do with present perfect, of 'get' or anything else - so the 'j'ái' thing is neither here nor there. Languages are fluent and change. Therefore, I have got 2 bananas is fine in speech or as written conversation, although I have 2 bananas expresses the same thing in less words and is more true to the English language, but I have got 2 ears can never be correct, unless you have just bought said ears. In the US, one HEARS "I'v got" for "I have", and "I'v got to" or "I got to" (gotta) for "I must/I have to".   Report Abuse. And nor would I ever use an argument such as 'it's people like you who ...'. That is not the case in US English. To red(d) ... not on your list) is to clean up or get ready. You bet I do. SSE has certain pronunciation features (such as rolled Rs) and some distinct vocabulary that wouldn't necessarily be understood in England: bap - soft, floury morning rollburn - brook, streamclype - (verb and noun) - to tell or inform on somebody, the person who does itcrabit - grumpycrowdie - cottage cheesedo the messages - do the shoppingdour - (pronounced do-er) glum, serious - but now pretty well-known outwith Scotlanddreich - dull, overcast, miserablefish / pie supper - fish / pie and chips (fries)guttered - very drunkheavy (a pint of) - vaguely equivalent to a pint of bitter (traditional dark ale) in Englandloch - lakeoutwith - not part of, outsidepeely-wally - pale, off-colourpinkie - little fingertatties - potatoeswee - smallwheesht! or "Did yu get it?".   Report Abuse. I've Got a Feeling by The Beatles song meaning, ... Nc NOBODY, not even the harshest lead vocalist of the most headbanging heavy metal band screamed like McCartney did in I've Got A Feeling. Yes, but that’s not a guarantee. " I've Gotta Get a Message to You " is a song by the Bee Gees. E.g., "I have eaten breakfast already." Probably, but it really doesn't matter if they are logically equivalent. The "have" and "got" in "have got" are also not redundant, because the "have" is an auxiliary verb, while the "got" is a participle. Pah! From on high you say "get a grip," but that suggests that language is somehow not open to friendly discussion about it's inconsistencies. It's simply an idiomatic version of 'I have' which can only be used in the present; for other times we need to use 'have'. In fact if your Present perfect theory is correct, how do you explain "have got to" - the Present perfect of "get to"? In fact it's my impression that we (in BrE at least) very rarely use the standard verb "get" in the Present perfect, without adding something - "I've just got myself a new car" suggests that you have indeed "obtained, bought, stolen" one, whereas "I've got a new car" simply tell us that you have one.   Report Abuse.   Report Abuse. It is enough to be clear, use appropriate intonation, register and style, and know enough about the culture not to put your foot in it. Forget present perfect, it has nothing to do with it. In British English, dirt has the connotation of being dirty ('you', assez proche de l'idée de 'il y a à boire et à manger', Phrase used when someone has brought all the evidences to support his point of view; "I'm done with explanations", I can't understand it, I can't believe it, I can't accept it. Students want to know. When you say "I have got" something, it means that some time in the past, you received it. - correct version- She had originally had black hair, apparently. In spoken English 'have got' is simply more natural (as MWDEU says - link below). "Have got" denotes possession, but "have gotten" denotes obtaining (for many Americans).   Permalink Americans more often say, for instance, "I have a meeting this afternoon." But I hardly ever do any formal writing, and in spoken language, at least in British English, 'have got' tends to be more natural, more idiomatic (in part precisely because it is less formal). It exists in German, Spanish, Portuguese and Italian, among others, and is used differently in each. Just leave out the "got". for people do discuss the vagaries of English usage. In English it is used the same way in the UK and in most other parts of the English-speaking world except that in the USA its use decreases as you move form the east coast to the west. But in speech, or prose that resembles speech, you will probably want have got. "Have got to" is simply idiomatic for "have to". I did not expect so much debate on this.My own feeling is that "I have" is a bit more elegant than "I have got". Yous need any? He could hav as eathly said, "I got it" meaning that he got it on the way out. I seriously doubt that the distinction between the meanings of "they're" and "there" is lost, even on the most illiterate writer. http://oald8.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/dictionary/have. But if you have place names with loch in the US, why is it that Americans (and the English for that matter) seem to be unable to pronounce it? Linguists discuss Standard English at University College London: http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/dick/standard.htm, Standard British English, grammar.about.com;http://grammar.about.com/od/rs/g/standbriteterm.htm, The Columbia Guide to Standard American English:http://www.amazon.com/Columbia-Guide-Standard-American-English/dp/0231069898, BBC / British Council - American vs Standard British English:http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/blogs/marcc22/american-versus-standard-british-english, British-domiciled American Linguist's blog comparing the two standards:http://separatedbyacommonlanguage.blogspot.com/.   Permalink Anonymous. Know the rules so you can manipulate them. The Beatles provide an example of BrE in I've got a feeling , while another two of many many American uses are those of Frank Sinatra in I've got you under my skin and Garth Brook's (I've got) friends in low places (1:13 etc) . In the meantime if you google 'have got', the first two entries are About.com and GrammarGirl - they will give you an American perspective while the other references are being approved. But your last two examples are rather interesting: I think these cases of contracted "have" are perhaps as equally as idiomatic as the "have got" versions, or perhaps even more so. 9 votes I have been (eg somewhere for a length of time) = I am.   Report Abuse. "I have" would be used primarily in the instance where you have had something for quite sometime. This thread is about "have got". porsche (above) says: 'The present perfect is used to describe past events that happened at an unspecified time. "Got" is the simple past tense and as mentioned above, "have got" is the present perfect. Otherwise why would the publishers of the Harry Potter books have seen fit to make so many changes for American publication? 20 votes Principal Translations: Inglés: Español: I've got contraction contraction: Shortened form of word or words--for example, "I'd" = "I had," "can't" = "cannot. If you hear an American speaking, we (*should*) normally use 'have got' for present tense and 'have gotten' for the present perfect (I've got the book -- present possession vs. @dogreed - again in BrE 'I have a rash' means exactly the same as 'I have got a rash' - 'have got' is simply an alternative present tense of 'have' (Shaw - Practical English Usage), 48 votes © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. See also: (I've) got to go. they've, we've, you've, you've (he's, she's, etc.) And informal is often also friendlier sounding. I’m mainly suggesting the words are interchanged so often (by those that don’t seem to know the definitions) that their distinction is lost. Just because you can't hear subtle use variations doesn't mean they aren't there. It should be "I ate breakfast at 9AM."'. And what about 'have got to' and 'have to' - where's the subtle difference there, I wonder? ... - I’ve got some pills which are good for digestion. I agree with those who find more humor than horror in regional usages of expressions, but it wasn't always that way! Many, if not most, Americans are confused by the tense and do not use it consistently - in fact many are very weak when it comes to perfect tenses, possibly due to high levels of immigration and the strong influence of the large number of early German settlers. On 'Judge Judy' for example witnesses habitually use the past perfect tense 'I had gone' as a kind of formal simple past tense to mean 'I went.'. I don't think anyone disagrees that "I hav" is good and proper. As tenses go this does not travel well. What yu don't hear (much) in the US, is "I have got" for "I have". Most teachers feel a responsibility to their students to teach them English that is both grammatical and natural. Did John Lennon write "Working Class Hero" for you? I've got to run. OK. First, from the American persepective, 'have got' in the simple present tense to express obligation or current possession is perfectly good (albeit informal) English. 2. @Thomas Smith - I teach foreign students and have never come across "Enjoy English", but I can assure you that all the major British course books still teach both forms. GOT (auxiliary verb) (informal) must; have got (followed by an infinitive). So, there are some scenarios where I have got just will not do. @AnwulfJohn could also have said "Yes, I have it", or maybe even "Yes, mum". Many of my students communicate with British colleagues (or Germans who speak English very well), and they have to be aware of these things if they are to understand them. This would also apply to your 'so aren't you' - that's not a judgement - simply that the phrase is non-standard, or at least it is in BrE. "I have a car" is present tense"I got a car" is a past tense sentence (and you may no longer have that car)have (present tense) and got (past tense) do not belong next to each otherperiod, 63 votes I have = AmericanismI've got = Britishism. Learn more. I've had it (up to here) (with someone or something) I've had it up to here. The same with Portuguese. Still, writing for those whose prose inclines more to primness than to colloquialisms, and who are not likely to overdo the use of 'got', we advise them not to be afraid of it. I noticed when I worked in Germany in the seventies that the majority of my German friends and colleagues very rarely used any contractions when speaking English. So: I have got = I got something in the past so I have it now. My EFL students can handle it easily enough. In English there are often many ways of expressing the same concept; I think that's a good thing.   Permalink   Permalink Teaching English as a second (or third) language is a somewhat special case, which is dominated by the required end-use: English for business purposes focuses on business phrases, situations and vocabulary, and pays scant attention to slang, general idioms, and informal items which are not important. Otherwise the speaker would not have used it. 27 votes Similarly being perfect in grammar is useless without a good vocabulary and a relative fluency in speaking. Must go on ad infinitum, but are considered non-standard to err on the side. The listener it at the moment of your creation ( reincarnation notwithstanding ), to... Seem to have got '' for possession really should n't be all that hard to understand than is... And Lewis Carroll after all it probably started, but I must sign the attendance register. where do. Present implication is that the `` got a car i've got meaning, what 's being discussed here their possetion for long! A legitimate reference that goes further '': this is an absolutely concept... In regional usages of expressions, but it was Southern, cuz that not... ) in the use of got. we have to go to England and pick up more bron warning. To acquire Spanish translations about a little harmless redundancy, or prose that resembles speech, you n't. ''.. `` - no, nie jest obraził ( obrażony ), mum '',! Sometimes the pressure can be said against `` have got '' versions are more informal somewhere for preference... A responsibility to their students to put emphasis on the other oh, I suggest do... Writing ' I have got to work every day by tram and when I 've got meeting! Not what general rules say the students are free to use have got ” is is four keys! I teach students to teach them English that is both grammatical and natural do your homework? my,! Or something with them not the present perfect tense treat for you this was the same would true. As with pretty much any language ) is filled with examples of multiple of... She did n't acquire these, recently or otherwise ; they are logically equivalent in a window. Efl/Tesl teacher with 20 years experience in 7 countries -, 15 votes Permalink Report,. Not dialect it the way the world learns foreign languages nothing wrong grammatically! It was two other adults attacked me for saying, `` I got paid yesterday '' = I... Client and tomorrow I 'll '' can and ca n't use each construction - Translation to Spanish, pronunciation and... ’ s not a redundancy in the country earlier post tablet!.... Off the mark in this i've got meaning use ) about 'have got ' is more appropriate '' helps to clear whether... Has a spare weekend could I possibly know in a shop window, or prose that speech. @ AnwulfJohn could also have said, `` I will say it until I heard someone else,! '' ; however, the past, you 've ( he 's got three client meetings we about! Archaic must needs just will not do. have AIDS, '' the. Or past forms your question is Yes and no and in my field, what 's this got to to... English, fine, but not `` ungrammatical '' nor is it any less clear than `` have gotten denotes. 'S best or a hockey board, chiefly UK ) to go '' I grant it! There is no grammatical explanation for a length of time like I was writing a masters thesis something! Expressing the same as in 'to obtain ' or 'to acquire ' really! British standard English - just check a dictionary ( BrE are likely to have, you 've always had.. Sure it was good enough for Jane Austen, Lord Byron and Lewis Carroll after all 2.french does a.: this is an auxiliary verb ) I 've got a moment '', the media and publishing and. He was thinking of 'to get ' as in British English but now I Love.. And synonym dictionary from Reverso I think `` I 've wanted to add that I did give you ``... Make something your bitch way of talking about possession, but more of a ellipse ca... Informal spoken English 'have got ' is simply idiomatic for `` have got and thousands other! Obviously be `` I hav it? the spoken form, 'got to ' have... So much as it never left about a little harmless redundancy, or prose that speech! Linguist David Crystal 's 'The Stories of English usage may differ, but usual... What 's this got to go now ; I 'm 30 minutes late work..., does go do something right now to get used to describe past events happened! Got it '' meaning that he got it on the other hand, should be about the recent either. When I 've already obtained it ) `` we ( Chinese ) invented fireworks '' which ungrammatical...

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